About This Item

CONTRACEPTIVE USE AND ATTITUDES OF MALE COLLEGE STUDENTS

Show full item record

File(s):

Author(s)
Lundgaard, Lindsey J.
Advisor(s)
Westphal, Judith
Degree
MS, Nursing --Clinical Nurse Leader
Date
Sep 2010
Subject(s)
Contraception; Contraceptives; Male college students - Hygiene and health
Abstract
Young adults in the United States have a high rate of unintended pregnancies. Specifically, this is a problem in the college setting, because this population has the highest rates of unintended pregnancies due to lack of contraceptive use and unsafe sexual practices (Bryant, 2009). Unintended pregnancies can lead to poor health outcomes for the parent, as well as the child. Since most college students are sexually active, contraceptive education is extremely important for healthcare providers to address with this population to help decrease unintended pregnancy rates. The purpose of this study was to examine the contraceptive attitudes and demographic characteristics among a group of male college students and to identify the varying characteristics between three different groups of contraceptive users. The final sample consisted of 53 male college students who were sexually active within the past three months. Participants completed a demographic data/contraceptive use questionnaire and the Contraceptive Attitude Scale (1998) as developed by Dr. Kelly Black. A quantitative, comparative descriptive design was used in this study. After data collection, participants were divided into three groups: (a) uninterrupted contraceptive users, (b) intermittent contraceptive users, and (c) contraceptive nonusers. The contraceptive attitudes and demographic characteristics of each group were compared. Demographic data was also compared with Contraceptive Attitude scores. The Theory of Reasoned Action combined with the Theory of Planned Behavior (Ajzen, 1991) was used as the theoretical framework for this study. No significant difference in demographic characteristics and contraceptive attitudes for race, age, marital status, class level, religion, and income between the contraceptive groups was found. A majority of the participants had a positive attitude regarding contraceptives. Men in the uninterrupted contraceptive user group had a higher mean contraceptive attitude score than intermittent users and nonusers. The results of this study may help healthcare providers to identify men at risk and provide necessary education to increase contraceptive use and, hopefully, decrease rates of unintended pregnancy.
Description
Clinical Paper Submitted In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements For the Degree of Master of Science in Nursing Clinical Nurse Leader
Permanent link
http://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/48044 
Export
Export to RefWorks 

Part of

Show full item record



Advanced Search

Browse

Deposit materials

About MINDS@UW