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THE LIVED EXPERIENCE OF NURSES WHO ENCOUNTER THE UNEXPECTED DEATH OF A PATIENT

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dc.contributor.advisor Wurzbach, Mary Ellen
dc.contributor.author Mumbrue, Teresa L.
dc.date.accessioned 2010-11-08T14:44:57Z
dc.date.available 2010-11-08T14:44:57Z
dc.date.issued 2010-05
dc.identifier.uri http://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/47126
dc.description A Clinical Paper Submitted In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements For the Degree of Master of Science in Nursing Family Nurse Practitioner en
dc.description.abstract Nurses are the primary caregivers for patients while in the hospital. Regrettably, stable patients often experience complications that were otherwise unanticipated. Often times, patients die and the nurse is left to cope alone and try to understand the emotional stirrings that are often unsettling. While many studies focus on improving patient quality of care provided by the nurse, few, if any, examine the nurse and the perspective they may have on the dynamic healthcare environment and unexpected patient deaths. Grief is common among nurses and is often heartfelt when a patient dies, but that grief is often ignored (Brosche, 2007). The negative impact of this phenomenon may lead to nurses experiencing moral issues, specifically moral distress as well as compassion fatigue. The emotional reaction of nurses who experience a patient?s death that was unexpected has largely been unexamined. The purpose of this study is to describe the lived experience of nurses who care for patients who unexpectedly die. The research question is; what is the lived experience of nurses who encounter the unexpected death of a patient? The theoretical framework that provides the foundation for this study is Lazarus' theory of stress, coping and adaptation along with Spiegelberg's approach to understanding phenomenon as lived by the person experiencing the phenomenon. A naturalistic paradigm coupled with a descriptive phenomenological approach was used in order to describe the meaning of the experience many nurses face when exposed to patients deaths. The participants for this study are nurses that are currently employed in a hospital setting and have experienced this phenomenon. Data analysis consisted of Spiegelberg's method of interpretation of the qualitative data. en
dc.description.provenance Submitted by Susan Raasch (raasch@uwosh.edu) on 2010-11-08T14:44:57Z No. of bitstreams: 1 T Mumbrue CP.pdf: 388219 bytes, checksum: bf49ff0509ecfa962a22ee759c557f90 (MD5) en
dc.description.provenance Made available in DSpace on 2010-11-08T14:44:57Z (GMT). No. of bitstreams: 1 T Mumbrue CP.pdf: 388219 bytes, checksum: bf49ff0509ecfa962a22ee759c557f90 (MD5) Previous issue date: 2010-05 en
dc.language.iso en_US en
dc.subject Death psychological aspects en
dc.subject Nursing psychological aspects en
dc.subject Hospital patients mortality en
dc.subject Nurse and patient en
dc.title THE LIVED EXPERIENCE OF NURSES WHO ENCOUNTER THE UNEXPECTED DEATH OF A PATIENT en
dc.type Clinical paper en
thesis.degree.level MS en
thesis.degree.discipline Nursing - Family Nurse Practitioner en

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