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SMOKING CESSATION AFTER CORONARY ARTERY DISEASE: A PILOT STUDY

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Author(s)
Berger, Julie A.
Advisor(s)
Mamocha, Suzanne
Degree
MS, Nursing - Family Nurse Practitioner
Date
Apr 2010
Subject(s)
Smoking cessation - Psychological aspects; Cigarette smokers - Psychology; Health risk assessment; Coronary heart disease
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to examine behavioral factors related to smoking that differentiated those who quit smoking following a diagnosis of coronary artery disease from those who did not quit smoking. Reasons for smoking such as behaviors, attitudes toward smoking, and physical dependence vary among individuals, as does their readiness and motivation to quit smoking. By examining an individual's behaviors related to smoking, the Advanced Practice Nurse (APN) can better understand the learning needs of the patient in order to provide a more effective and successful smoking cessation intervention program. This is an important step when initiating smoking cessation education to patients following a diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD). The APN is perfectly suited to implement strategies and interventions because of their expertise in health promotion and prevention, patient education, and communication skills. A descriptive pilot study was done utilizing a convenience sample from two outpatient cardiac rehabilitation clinics. The participants had been smokers prior to their diagnosis of CAD. A demographic sheet (Appendix A) was given to the participants. The Glover-Nilsson Smoking Behavioral Questionnaire (GN-SBQ, Appendix B) was also given to the participants. The theoretical framework that supported this study was The Health Promotion Model (HPM) by Pender. This model guides the exploration of biopsychosocial processes that encourage individuals to participate in behaviors aimed at health improvement (McEwen & Wills, 2007). Previous behavior as well as inherited and acquired characteristics of individuals can influence their beliefs, affect, and performance ofhealth promoting behaviors. Thus, an individual's characteristics and experiences may influence whether or not they quit smoking after being diagnosed with CAD. An individual's perceptions on whether or not they are able to implement a specific behavior, such as smoking cessation, may also significantly impact the likelihood of commitment to action and actual performance of the specific behavior (Pender, Murdaugh, & Parsons, 2002).
Description
A Clinical Paper Submitted in Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements For the Degree of Master of Science in Nursing Family Nurse Practitioner
Permanent link
http://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/47084 
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