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THE HEALTH BELIEFS, PERCEPTIONS AND BREAST CANCER SCREENING AMONG FEMALE UNIVERSITY STAFF

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Author(s)
Srisuthipornsakul, Charisao
Advisor(s)
Collier, Jill
Degree
MS, Nursing - Family Nurse Practitioner
Date
May 2010
Subject(s)
Women health and hygiene; Medical screening; Breast cancer; Breast examination
Abstract
Breast cancer is the most common non-skin cancer among women in the United States. Approximately 40,170 females will lose their lives from the disease. The National Cancer Institute (NCI) estimated that 192,370 females were expected to be diagnosed with breast cancer in 2009. National Cancer Institute (2009) also explained that treatment is more likely to work well when cancer is found early. The NCI recommends women reduce risks that could lead to breast cancer and diligently engage in routine breast cancer screening. Many women are aware of the recommendation to begin breast cancer screening at age 40?but many are not. Assessing women?s health beliefs regarding breast cancer and breast cancer screening allows clinicians to provide appropriate education to encourage women to practice healthy behaviors. This study uses The Health Belief Model Scales to measure beliefs related to breast cancer and to identify health beliefs regarding breast cancer screening among female university employees in Wisconsin. This study examines the factors of health motivation, barriers of mammography, and benefits of mammography as measured on survey questions in the Champion Breast Cancer Health Belief tool to determine which factors predict frequency of mammography. This tool was developed using the health belief model, a useful tool for examining motivations for engaging in or not engaging in health behaviors. A convenience sample of 107 female university employees working at the University of Wisconsin-Oshkosh was surveyed. Demographic characteristics are reported. Stepwise method of the multiple regression analysis was used to analyze all variables. The four variables were found to be significant with the adjusted R square = 0.432; F= 10.722, p<0.0005. The model explained 43.2% of variance in Years Since Last Mammography variable. These variables included: (a) I have regular health check-ups even when I am not sick, (b) Having a routine mammogram or x-ray of the breast would make me worry about breast cancer, (c) Having a mammogram or x-ray of the breast would take too much time, and (d) Having a mammogram or x-ray of the breast would be embarrassing.
Description
A Clinical Paper Submitted In Partial Fulfillment of the Requirements For the Degree of Master of Science in Nursing Family Nurse Practitioner
Permanent link
http://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/46939 
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