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The Early Black Press and Social Obligation to Abolish Slavery

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Author(s)
Hernandez, Amanda
Citation
Oshkosh Scholar. Volume IV, November 2009, pp.62-70
Date
Nov 2009
Subject(s)
African American newspapers -- History -- 19th century; African American press -- History -- 19th century; Slavery -- United States -- History; Abolitionists -- United States -- History; Antislavery movements -- United States -- History
Abstract
The creation of the black press was spurred by the growing abolitionist sentiment of the antebellum period in America. The growing press developed different methods to reach free blacks and encourage them to join the abolitionist movement. One approach sought to promote the enrichment and advancement of African Americans within white society, while the other focused on attacking slavery and bringing to the surface its evils. By examining archived antebellum black papers and historians? research, this study considers the effectiveness of both methods of the black press to help bring about the abolition of slavery. A critical analysis of these resources indicates that both approaches were indeed crucial in garnering support for the abolitionist movement and successful in getting free blacks to join the movement.
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http://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/46305 
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