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"The Fire is in Rhodesia" : Jimmy Carter's Response to the Rhodesian Bush War

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Author(s)
Stepanik, Andrea
Advisor(s)
Gough, Robert (Robert J.); Rice, Louisa C.
Date
2009
Subject(s)
Carter, Jimmy, 1924-; Zimbabwe--History--Chimurenga War, 1966-1980; Zimbabwe--Foreign relations--United States; United States--Foreign relations--Zimbabwe
Abstract
Over the course of the mid-twentieth century, American foreign policy in Africa centered on containing the spread of communism. When Jimmy Carter was elected, he sought to change the Cold War-driven policies in Africa and focused on a regional approach toward the continent. He made war-torn Rhodesia a high priority in African relations and led the first administration to play a major role in negotiations for peace in the country. Throughout his term as president from 1977 to 1981, Carter and members of his administration continued to pursue peace in Rhodesia. From developing a proposal for peace with British officials to refusing to lift sanctions on the country until free elections were held, Carter did not falter in his position for majority rule. While his efforts to invoke a moral and regional approach to African affairs were not always supported domestically, Carter's policies were different from those of previous presidents. His efforts resulted in the United States playing a major role in negotiating the end of the armed struggle.
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http://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/39001 
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