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From Tomboys to Athletes: How Title IX Changed Women's Athletics at UW-Eau Claire, 1972-1980

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Author(s)
Jahnke, Jill
Advisor(s)
Gough, Robert (Robert J.); Pederson, Jane Marie
Date
Jun 25, 2008
Subject(s)
College sports--Wisconsin--Eau Claire; University of Wisconsin--Eau Claire--Sports--History; United States. Education Amendments of 1972. Title IX; Women athletes--Wisconsin--Eau Claire; Sex discrimination in sports--Wisconsin--Eau Claire
Series
USGZE AS333
Abstract
Prior to the passage of Title IX of the Education Amendment of 1972, women and men did not play on equal fields, literally. There were few, if any, athletic programs, had limited or non-existent budgets, and were not treated as athletes. People called girls who played sports ?tomboys.? Yet, when Title IX passed in 1972, intending to end sex discrimination in federally funded educational institutions, people thought that it was a complete solution to the problem. However, it would take years to develop Title IX regulations. Contrary to popular belief, women did not see equality for years, decades, and in some cases are still looking for complete compliance. The many changes and difficult issues surrounding Title IX can be seen by looking at the athletic department at UW-Eau Claire from 1970-1985.
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http://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/28700 
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