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Model of Success: Camp McCoy's Prisoner of War Camp during World War II

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Author(s)
Grochowski, John M.
Advisor(s)
Sanislo, Teresa M.; Shoemaker, Earl Arthur
Date
Mar 12, 2008
Subject(s)
World War, 1939-1945--Wisconsin; Prisoners of war--Wisconsin--History; Camp McCoy (Wis.)--History; World War, 1939-1945--Prisoners of war, German; Prisoner-of-war camps--Wisconsin
Series
AS333
Abstract
Camp McCoy, as the largest and most important prisoner of war camp in Wisconsin during World War II, had the greatest responsibility of ensuring that the policies of the military and the requirements of the Geneva Convention were carried out. Both the state of prisoner life in the camp and the POW labor program reveal that Camp McCoy's commanding officer, Lieutenant Colonel Horace I. Rogers, met the objectives of the United States Military and proved committed to the proper treatment of German prisoners of war as stipulated by the Geneva Convention of 1929 and in many respects exceeded its expectations. As a result, Camp McCoy proved to be an effective prisoner of war camp, creating a positive experience for German prisoners and accomplishing the objectives desired by the U.S. Military. This paper examines the experience of German prisoners at Camp McCoy, Wisconsin and the success of McCoy as a POW camp.
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http://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/23516 
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