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WIMACHTENDIENK, WINGOLAUCHSIKM, WITANMEUI : Use of Native Culture in the Order of the Arrow

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Author(s)
Farley, Michelle Denise
Advisor(s)
Lang, Katherine H.; St. Germaine, Richard D.
Date
Jan 04, 2008
Subject(s)
Indians in popular culture.; Order of the Arrow.; Boy Scouts of America.; United States--Civilization--Indian influences.; Indians of North America--Ethnic identity.; Indians of North America--Public opinion.
Series
AS333
Abstract
Founded in the United States in 1907, the Boy Scouts of America are a cultural icon of altruistic character, moral fiber, and strong masculine tradition. The Order of the Arrow is a service fraternity within the Boy Scouts. Founded in 1915 at a Pennsylvanian camp, the ?Brotherhood of Cheerful Service? inducted Scouts who exemplified Scout law and tried to keep camping traditions throughout the year. The ceremony used to induct new Arrowmen included Native American tribal dances, a Native-inspired creation myth, and Plains-style regalia. This ceremony is in use still today. Scholars traditionally placed the OA ceremony alongside Indian hobbyists and other youth organizations that ?played Indian? as a way to reaffirm white American identity, but changes in the OA ceremony indicate a shift towards Native culture preservation.
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http://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/22918 
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